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Dogs


5 Pet-Related Reminders For the Upcoming Daylight Saving Time

No matter how you feel about Daylight Saving Time (and we know people have very strong opinions!), it’s coming in hot…or at least lukewarm. Daylight Saving Time is on March 13th this year, so we will be “springing forward” in less than two weeks. In preparation for it, we’ve come up with five things you can do that revolve around you and your fur friends.

napping with pets


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6 Ways to Keep Your Pets Active During the Winter

Helping your pet stay active on cold and snowy winter days isn’t easy — especially if you are one of the many folks who prefers staying inside where it’s nice and toasty. Unfortunately, if you are only taking your dog outside for quick potty breaks and rushing back inside, they probably are not getting enough exercise. Even your indoor cat could experience boredom if you spend winter evenings camped out in front of the television rather than engaging them in play.


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6 Ways to Set Your Dog Up for Optimal Health in the New Year

With every New Year comes a wide variety of New Year’s resolutions for humans, many of which are health-focused — from exercising regularly and eating healthier to quitting smoking and learning yoga. It only seems natural that our beloved dogs should also adopt a health-first approach to the New Year, which can be as easy as accompanying their owners during their fitness regimens. As we celebrate the New Year and all the positive change that comes with it, the following are six ways to set your dog up for optimal health in 2022 and make this year their best yet.


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Ready to Give Up on Crate Training? Try These Tips!

Crate training is one of the best things you can do to foster an excellent relationship between yourself and your canine companion. While you may feel a bit guilty about the mistaken notion that you’re “locking them up,” dogs instinctively look for small spaces when seeking shelter.


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6 Tips for Keeping Your Pets Safe in Wintery Weather

December is Winter Weather Safety Month, making it the perfect time to remind pet owners of the dangers that come with the cold winter months. From hypothermia risk and protecting sensitive paws to leashing your dog and ensuring adequate shelter for outdoor cats, there are many precautions to take to ensure your pets continue living their best lives straight through this cold, snowy season.


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3 Pet-Friendly Sweet Treats in Honor of National Dessert Day

Did someone say sweets?! October 14th is probably one of the best holidays ever, as it is National Dessert Day! You're likely wondering how this can be veterinary-related, as your pets can't safely eat sweets...or can they? Just like you and me, dogs and cats love sweet things (which is why you get the hairy eyeball every time you eat ice cream), and, thankfully, there are some ways that your pets can get in on this dessert holiday safely and sweetly.


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National Walk Your Dog Week: Tips for Walking Your Canine Companion

Did you know that the first week of October is National Walk Your Dog Week? Going for a walk with your canine companion is beneficial every day of the year, but this week is a great time to think about how you can make walks with your dog safer and more enjoyable for you both. Proper walking techniques minimize stress, and they make it much easier to get out and enjoy a stroll with your pup. In honor of Walk Your Dog Week, keep reading to discover a few tips for waking your canine companion.


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World Rabies Day: Facts, Prevention, and Actions To Take if Your Pet is Bitten

As veterinarians, we’ve noticed that many people tend to think that rabies is a thing of the past, but, unfortunately, that’s not the reality. According to the CDC, approximately 5,000 animal rabies cases are reported annually, with more than 90 percent of those occurring in wildlife. So while dogs and cats are no longer getting rabies as much as they did in the mid-1900s, the principal hosts in the U.S. today are raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes.


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